School of music
OVERNIGHT CLASSICS:
with Peter Van de Graaff
Exploring Music
Met
Host Bill McGlaughlin guides listeners through a new musical theme each week, devoting five hours to a single topic. McGlaughlin’s in-depth knowledge of and deep passion for classical music gives the series his customary enthusiasm, imagination, and spontaneity. He is a Peabody Award-winning broadcaster, conductor, and composer.
exploring music
Schedule
Weekdays at 9pm

on 89.1 FM and 89.5 FM (southern Utah County)
or online at www.classical89.org/streaming
Program Schedule
November 16
Music in Time of War
This week we explore works inspired by, reacting to, or written in protest of war. Bill opens with Mass in Time of War by Joseph Haydn, an oddly cheery mass that Haydn wrote in the hopes that it would convince God to stop Napoleon’s advance into Austria. Beethoven, fascinated by military maneuvers, used music to create a scene of battle in which the British and French are represented by a leitmotif from their respective countries. We continue with patriotism and the pain of war expressed by Russian composers Tchaikovsky and Shostakovich, and end in England and America with Britten’s War Requiem, and Roy Harris’s “When Johnny Comes Marching Home.” Playlist information at
November 19
Martha Graham and her Music
Martha Graham changed the way we think about dance, as much as Igor Stravinsky did with music, and Pablo Picasso with his paintings and sculpture. Her choreography was born out of a close relationship to fresh-off-the-page music: she commissioned ballets from American composers Samuel Barber, Aaron Copland, and Louis Horst— whose music would be all but forgotten if it were not for archival films of Graham’s early dances like her 1931 Primitive Mysteries. She lived a long, passionate life and her ashes are scattered across the Sangre de Cristo mountain range above Santa Fe, New Mexico. There they mingle with the memories of so many artists from her generation. Playlist information at exploringmusic.wfmt.com.
November 20
Martha Graham and her Music
Martha Graham changed the way we think about dance, as much as Igor Stravinsky did with music, and Pablo Picasso with his paintings and sculpture. Her choreography was born out of a close relationship to fresh-off-the-page music: she commissioned ballets from American composers Samuel Barber, Aaron Copland, and Louis Horst— whose music would be all but forgotten if it were not for archival films of Graham’s early dances like her 1931 Primitive Mysteries. She lived a long, passionate life and her ashes are scattered across the Sangre de Cristo mountain range above Santa Fe, New Mexico. There they mingle with the memories of so many artists from her generation. Playlist information at exploringmusic.wfmt.com.
November 21
Martha Graham and her Music
Martha Graham changed the way we think about dance, as much as Igor Stravinsky did with music, and Pablo Picasso with his paintings and sculpture. Her choreography was born out of a close relationship to fresh-off-the-page music: she commissioned ballets from American composers Samuel Barber, Aaron Copland, and Louis Horst— whose music would be all but forgotten if it were not for archival films of Graham’s early dances like her 1931 Primitive Mysteries. She lived a long, passionate life and her ashes are scattered across the Sangre de Cristo mountain range above Santa Fe, New Mexico. There they mingle with the memories of so many artists from her generation. Playlist information at exploringmusic.wfmt.com.
November 22
Martha Graham and her Music
Martha Graham changed the way we think about dance, as much as Igor Stravinsky did with music, and Pablo Picasso with his paintings and sculpture. Her choreography was born out of a close relationship to fresh-off-the-page music: she commissioned ballets from American composers Samuel Barber, Aaron Copland, and Louis Horst— whose music would be all but forgotten if it were not for archival films of Graham’s early dances like her 1931 Primitive Mysteries. She lived a long, passionate life and her ashes are scattered across the Sangre de Cristo mountain range above Santa Fe, New Mexico. There they mingle with the memories of so many artists from her generation. Playlist information at exploringmusic.wfmt.com.
November 23
Martha Graham and her Music
Martha Graham changed the way we think about dance, as much as Igor Stravinsky did with music, and Pablo Picasso with his paintings and sculpture. Her choreography was born out of a close relationship to fresh-off-the-page music: she commissioned ballets from American composers Samuel Barber, Aaron Copland, and Louis Horst— whose music would be all but forgotten if it were not for archival films of Graham’s early dances like her 1931 Primitive Mysteries. She lived a long, passionate life and her ashes are scattered across the Sangre de Cristo mountain range above Santa Fe, New Mexico. There they mingle with the memories of so many artists from her generation. Playlist information at exploringmusic.wfmt.com.
November 26
Gabriel Fauré
Gabriel Fauré (1845-1924) was the vanguard composer of his generation in France. Devoting a series to him comes from a listener suggestion. Bill feels Fauré’s early prowess places him in the prodigy category with Mendelssohn and Mozart. As proof, Bill begins the week with “Le papillon et la fleur” (The butterfly and the flower) and “Mai”, both written when Fauré was 16. Bill then offers some examples that display Fauré’s mastery of short pieces, and explains Fauré’s many harmonic and melodic innovations, as in his famous Requiem. Playlist information at exploringmusic.wfmt.com.
November 27
Gabriel Fauré
Gabriel Fauré (1845-1924) was the vanguard composer of his generation in France. Devoting a series to him comes from a listener suggestion. Bill feels Fauré’s early prowess places him in the prodigy category with Mendelssohn and Mozart. As proof, Bill begins the week with “Le papillon et la fleur” (The butterfly and the flower) and “Mai”, both written when Fauré was 16. Bill then offers some examples that display Fauré’s mastery of short pieces, and explains Fauré’s many harmonic and melodic innovations, as in his famous Requiem. Playlist information at exploringmusic.wfmt.com.
November 28
Gabriel Fauré
Gabriel Fauré (1845-1924) was the vanguard composer of his generation in France. Devoting a series to him comes from a listener suggestion. Bill feels Fauré’s early prowess places him in the prodigy category with Mendelssohn and Mozart. As proof, Bill begins the week with “Le papillon et la fleur” (The butterfly and the flower) and “Mai”, both written when Fauré was 16. Bill then offers some examples that display Fauré’s mastery of short pieces, and explains Fauré’s many harmonic and melodic innovations, as in his famous Requiem. Playlist information at exploringmusic.wfmt.com.
November 29
Gabriel Fauré
Gabriel Fauré (1845-1924) was the vanguard composer of his generation in France. Devoting a series to him comes from a listener suggestion. Bill feels Fauré’s early prowess places him in the prodigy category with Mendelssohn and Mozart. As proof, Bill begins the week with “Le papillon et la fleur” (The butterfly and the flower) and “Mai”, both written when Fauré was 16. Bill then offers some examples that display Fauré’s mastery of short pieces, and explains Fauré’s many harmonic and melodic innovations, as in his famous Requiem. Playlist information at exploringmusic.wfmt.com.